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WHAT TO HARVEST

Apples, Apricots, Egg plant, Kale, Mushrooms, Nectarines ,Peaches, Pumpkins, Radishes, Tomatoes

PLANT OF THE MONTH

Bougainvillea glabra

Botanical name: Nyctaginaceae family
Colour: Ivory/Yellow flowers and Purple/Pink petal-like bracts

All species of Bougainvillea do well in warm to hot climates.  For best results, plant bougainvillea in a light well-drained soil in a sunny position. Although drought tolerant, they need plenty of moisture during the flowering season. Overfeeding will produce masses of foliage but very little in the way of colourful bracts. Propagate from cuttings taken in summer.  If unsupported, these plants will remain compact or behave as ground covers, while if given support they will climb vigorously, using their sharp thorns as a means of attachment.

 

NEWS FROM THE FARM

Dragon fruit, (Hylocereus sp.) a stunningly beautiful fruit native to Central America that is becoming increasingly popular to be grown commercially in South East Queensland for the Melbourne and Sydney markets. Demand is high amongst the Asian communities particularly for the Chinese New Year as it is harvested between December and February.

Fruit size, colour and high Brix rating is achieved by copious amount of water supply and top dressing with Organic Xtra at 2.5 tonne per hectare or Eco 88 at 850 kg per hectare. Similarly to blueberries, this plant responds exceptionally well to low salt index organic based fertilizer blends.

WHAT TO PLANT

Tropical & Sub Tropical – Chilli Peppers, Climbing Beans, Cucumber, Eggplant, Lettuce, Pumpkin, Radish, Sweet Corn, Squash, Sweet Potato, Tomato.
Cool/Temperate – Beetroot, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Capsicum, Carrot, Cauliflower, Celery, French Bean, Kohl Rabi, Swedes, Sweet Corn, Onion, Parsnip, Turnip.

SOIL UPDATE

If there’s been good rain, your garden is probably overgrown, and your soil nutrient stressed and possibly waterlogged, so may need some immediate attention.  Most soils will appreciate fertiliser to replace nutrients leached away, and set them up for the autumn growing season. If there’s still a lot of rain about, breaking a normal application up into smaller doses spread over the next few weeks can help reduce leaching losses.  If the soil has become very acid (do a pH test), you might wish to apply lime or dolomite.

PROGRESS IN YOUR VEGGIE PATCH

Outdoor weather conditions are still difficult for vegetables at this time of year.  We’ll be moving into the autumn planting season soon, so take this opportunity to tidy-up the vegetable garden and prepare beds for new crops. This includes QO dolomite where necessary, especially if you intend growing peas or beans, the cabbage family and lettuce.

 

 

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Download the February 2018 Gardening Guide